Call for Abstract

2nd International Conference and Business Expo on Wireless & Telecommunication , will be organized around the theme ““Connecting People to Connecting Global””

Wireless 2016 is comprised of 24 tracks and 1 sessions designed to offer comprehensive sessions that address current issues in Wireless 2016.

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks. All related abstracts are accepted.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

5G (5th generation mobile networks or 5th generation wireless systems) denotes the next major phase of mobile telecommunications standards beyond the current 4G/IMT-Advanced standards. 5G has speeds beyond what the current 4G can offer.

 

5G should be rolled out by 2020 to meet business and consumer demands. In addition to providing simply faster speeds, they predict that 5G networks also will need to meet the needs of new use cases, such as the Internet of Things as well as broadcast-like services and lifeline communication in times of natural disaster.

 

Although updated standards that define capabilities beyond those defined in the current 4G standards are under consideration, those new capabilities are still being grouped under the current ITU-T 4G standards.

Telecommunications is any means of electronic data transfer using electromagnetic means, most commonly radio waves. The data transferred is often in the form of digital information, which includes voice transmission. Telecommunications can also include analog signals, though these are being phased out in many industries. Telecommunication is also usually thought of as being two-way, with both sides having receiving and transmission capabilities.

Today, wired connections are slowly being replaced by different latest, emerging wireless technologies. Emergence of new wireless technologies has helped to bring out many new ideas and applications to the society. In this era, we all are expecting different solutions in the wireless field which helps to explode out many new types of wireless technology. Wireless technology is just a latest technical term given to describe telecommunication where the EM (electromagnetic) waves carry signal over communication path. Now let’s explore knowledge on to the latest, emerging wireless technologies.

  • Track 3-1Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks

Wireless models represent the movement of mobile user, and how their location, velocity and acceleration change over time. Such models are frequently used for simulation purposes when new communication or navigation techniques are investigated. Mobility management schemes for mobile communication systems make use of mobility models for predicting future user positions.

 

Simulation is the imitation of the operation of a real-world process or system over time. The act of simulating something first requires that a model be developed; this model represents the key characteristics or behaviours/functions of the selected physical or abstract system or process. The model represents the system itself, whereas the simulation represents the operation of the system over time.

There are a variety of wireless communication systems for transmitting voice, video, and data in local or wide areas. There are point-to-point wireless bridges, wireless local area networks, multidirectional wireless cellular systems, and satellite communication systems.

 

This topic discusses "mobile" wireless technologies that provide voice and data communication services to mobile users who use cell phones, PDAs, Internet terminals, and related computing devices. Refer to "Wireless Communications" for a list of related wireless topics.

The explosive growth and widespread application of high rate multimedia wireless communications have drastically increased the power consumption of wireless networks. However, the advances in battery technology have not kept pace, resulting in a severe mismatch between the energy thirst and battery capacity of mobile units. Moreover, wireless communications are facing an increasingly serious challenge as the total energy consumed by communication and networking devices as well as the greenhouse gas emissions related to network manufacturing and operation are increasing significantly, which result in high operation expenditure and environmental devastation. Green wireless communications, which emphasizes on energy efficiency, is thereby attracting more and more attention and becoming the main trend for future wireless network design.

There are a variety of wireless communication systems for transmitting voice, video, and data in local or wide areas. There are point-to-point wireless bridges, wireless local area networks, multidirectional wireless cellular systems, and satellite communication systems.

 

This topic discusses "mobile" wireless technologies that provide voice and data communication services to mobile users who use cell phones, PDAs, Internet terminals, and related computing devices. Refer to "Wireless Communications" for a list of related wireless topics.

Today, wired connections are slowly being replaced by different latest, emerging wireless technologies. Emergence of new wireless technologies has helped to bring out many new ideas and applications to the society. In this era, we all are expecting different solutions in the wireless field which helps to explode out many new types of wireless technology. Wireless technology is just a latest technical term given to describe telecommunication where the EM (electromagnetic) waves carry signal over communication path. Now let’s explore knowledge on to the latest, emerging wireless technologies.

Wireless is a term used to describe telecommunications in which electromagnetic waves (rather than some form of wire) carry the signal over part or the entire communication path. Some monitoring devices, such as intrusion alarms, employ acoustic waves at frequencies above the range of human hearing; these are also sometimes classified as wireless.

 

The wireless method of communication uses low-powered radio waves to transmit data between devices. High powered transmission sources usually require government licenses to broadcast on a specific wavelength. This platform has historically carried voice and has grown into a large industry, carrying many thousands of broadcasts around the world. Radio waves are now increasingly being used by unregulated computer users.

Multimedia computing is the key to developing and maintaining action-oriented software. The computer you’re using right now has come a long way from the earliest models. Thanks to the talents of those in the field of multimedia computing, the capabilities of computers — from animation to Web design, from audio and video compression to instant messaging — have expanded at a remarkable rate, and there’s no end in sight. You can become an integral part of this phenomenon. The program includes basic computing background, mathematical training especially geared to multimedia design and production, and courses in multimedia computing and digital arts. You’ll be instructed by a faculty of almost 30 full-time professors in one of the largest college computer and information science departments in the metropolitan New York area. And with more than 1,000 computers available for your use on campus, you’ll always find a place to practice and hone the skills that will make you a leader in this burgeoning field.

An Internet service is an organization that provides services for accessing, using, or participating in the Internet. Internet service providers may be organized in various forms, such as commercial, community-owned, non-profit, or otherwise privately owned.

 

Internet services typically provided include Internet access, Internet transit, domain name registration, web hosting, Usenet service, and colocation.

A wireless network uses radio waves to connect devices such as laptops to the Internet and to your business network and its applications. When you connect a laptop to a Wi-Fi hotspot at a cafe, hotel, airport lounge, or other public place, you're connecting to that business's wireless network. A wired network connects devices to the Internet or other network using cables. The most common wired networks use cables connected to Ethernet ports on the network router on one end and to a computer or other device on the cable's opposite end.

Communication in Defence and Aviation involve all aspects of communications, or conveyance of information, by armed forces. Military communications span from pre-history to the present. The earliest military communications were delivered by humans on foot. Later, communications progressed to visual and audible signals, and then advanced into the electronic age. Examples from Jane's Military Communications include telecommunication, wireless communication, tactical ground-based communications, terrestrial microwave, tropospheric scatter, naval, satellite communications systems and equipment, surveillance and signal analysis, encryption and security and direction-finding and jamming.

 

Wireless Sensors can be used in locations that are difficult to access due to extreme conditions such as high temperature, pH, pressure, etc. Using wireless sensors, operators can continuously supervise processes in hazardous environments and report the data back to an operator in a monitoring facility located at a safe distance away. Wireless measurement is also useful for obtaining data in hard to access locations.

In computer networking, a wireless access point (AP) is a device that allows wireless devices to connect to a wired network using Wi-Fi, or related standards. The AP usually connects to a router (via a wired network) as a standalone device, but it can also be an integral component of the router itself.

Asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) is a type of digital subscriber line (DSL) technology, a data communications technology that enables faster data transmission over copper telephone lines than a conventional voice band modem can provide. ADSL differs from the less common symmetric digital subscriber line (SDSL). Bandwidth (and bit rate) is greater toward the customer premises (known as downstream) than the reverse (known as upstream). This is why it is called asymmetric. Providers usually market ADSL as a service for consumers to receive Internet access in a relatively passive mode: able to use the higher speed direction for the download from the Internet but not needing to run servers that would require high speed in the other direction.

In telecommunications, broadband is a wide bandwidth data transmission with an ability to simultaneously transport multiple signals and traffic types. The medium can be coaxial cable, optical fibre, radio or twisted pair.

In the context of Internet access broadband is used much more loosely; to mean any high-speed Internet access that is always on and faster than traditional dial-up access.

The term became popularized through the 1990s as a marketing term for Internet access that was faster than dialup access, the original Internet access technology, which was limited to 56 Kbit/s. This meaning is only distantly related to its original technical meaning.

Bluetooth is a wireless technology standard for exchanging data over short distances (using short-wavelength UHF radio waves in the ISM band from 2.4 to 2.485 GHz) from fixed and mobile devices and building personal area networks (PANs). Invented by telecom vendor Ericsson in 1994, it was originally conceived as a wireless alternative to RS-232 data cables. It can connect several devices, overcoming problems of synchronization.

 

Bluetooth is managed by the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG), which has more than 25,000 member companies in the areas of telecommunication, computing, networking, and consumer electronics. The IEEE standardized Bluetooth as IEEE 802.15.1, but no longer maintains the standard. The Bluetooth SIG oversees development of the specification, manages the qualification program, and protects the trademarks. A manufacturer must make a device meet Bluetooth SIG standards to market it as a Bluetooth device. A network of patents apply to the technology, which are licensed to individual qualifying devices.

A computer network or data network is a telecommunications network which allows computers to exchange data. In computer networks, networked computing devices exchange data with each other along network links (data connections). The connections between nodes are established using either cable media or wireless media. The best-known computer network is the Internet.

 

Network computer devices that originate, route and terminate the data are called network nodes. Nodes can include hosts such as personal computers, phones, servers as well as networking hardware. Two such devices can be said to be networked together when one device is able to exchange information with the other device, whether or not they have a direct connection to each other.

 

Computer networks differ in the transmission media used to carry their signals, the communications protocols to organize network traffic, the network's size, topology and organizational intent. In most cases, communications protocols are layered on (i.e. work using) other more specific or more general communications protocols, except for the physical layer that directly deals with the transmission media.

3G, short form of third generation, is the third generation of mobile telecommunications technology. This is based on a set of standards used for mobile devices and mobile telecommunications use services and networks that comply with the International Mobile Telecommunications-2000 (IMT-2000) specifications by the International Telecommunication Union. 3G finds application in wireless voice telephony, mobile Internet access, fixed wireless Internet access, video calls and mobile TV.

 

3G telecommunication networks support services that provide an information transfer rate of at least 200 Kbit/s. Later 3G releases often denoted 3.5G and 3.75G also provide mobile broadband access of several Mbit/s to smartphones and mobile modems in laptop computers. This ensures it can be applied to wireless voice telephony, mobile Internet access, fixed wireless Internet access, video calls and mobile TV technologies.

 

4G, short for fourth generation, is the fourth generation of mobile telecommunications technology, succeeding 3G. A 4G system must provide capabilities defined by ITU in IMT Advanced. Potential and current applications include amended mobile web access, IP telephony, gaming services, high-definition mobile TV, video conferencing, 3D television, and cloud computing.

 

Two 4G candidate systems are commercially deployed: the Mobile WiMAX standard (first used in South Korea in 2007), and the first-release Long Term Evolution (LTE) standard (in Oslo, Norway and Stockholm, Sweden since 2009). It has however been debated if these first-release versions should be considered to be 4G or not, as discussed in the technical definition section below.

Mobile communication is human–computer interaction by which a computer is expected to be transported during normal usage. Mobile computing involves mobile communication, mobile hardware, and mobile software. Communication issues include ad hoc and infrastructure networks as well as communication properties, protocols, data formats and concrete technologies. Hardware includes mobile devices or device components. Mobile software deals with the characteristics and requirements of mobile applications.

WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) is a family of wireless communications standards initially designed to provide 30 to 40 megabit-per-second data rates, with the 2011 update providing up to 1 Gbit/s for fixed stations. The name "WiMAX" was created by the WiMAX Forum, which was formed in June 2001 to promote conformity and interoperability of the standard. The forum describes WiMAX as "a standards-based technology enabling the delivery of last mile wireless broadband access as an alternative to cable and DSL". IEEE 802.16m or Wireless MAN-Advanced is a candidate for the 4G, in competition with the LTE Advanced standard.

Ethernet is a family of computer networking technologies for local area networks (LANs) and metropolitan area networks (MANs). It was commercially introduced in 1980 and first standardized in 1983 as IEEE 802.3, and has since been refined to support higher bit rates and longer link distances. Over time, Ethernet has largely replaced competing wired LAN technologies such as token ring, FDDI, and ARCNET. The primary alternative for contemporary LANs is not a wired standard, but instead a wireless LAN standardized as IEEE 802.11 and also known as Wi-Fi.

Modem (modulator-demodulator) is a device that modulates one or more carrier wave signals to encode digital information for transmission and demodulates signals to decode the transmitted information. The goal is to produce a signal that can be transmitted easily and decoded to reproduce the original digital data. Modems can be used with any means of transmitting analog signals, from light emitting diodes to radio. A common type of modem is one that turns the digital data of a computer into modulated electrical signal for transmission over telephone lines and demodulated by another modem at the receiver side to recover the digital data.

Router is a networking device that forwards data packets between computer networks. Routers perform the "traffic directing" functions on the Internet. A data packet is typically forwarded from one router to another through the networks that constitute the internetwork until it reaches its destination node.

Signal processing is an enabling technology that encompasses the fundamental theory, applications, algorithms, and implementations of processing or transferring information contained in many different physical, symbolic, or abstract formats broadly designated as signals. It uses mathematical, statistical, computational, heuristic, and linguistic representations, formalisms, and techniques for representation, modelling, analysis, synthesis, discovery, recovery, sensing, acquisition, extraction, learning, security, or forensics.